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Tax Relief for North and South Carolina Victims of Hurricane Florence

Posted September 30, 2018

SC-2018-01, Sept. 24, 2018

SOUTH CAROLINA — Victims of Hurricane Florence that took place beginning on Sept. 8, 2018 in South Carolina may qualify for tax relief from the Internal Revenue Service.

The President has declared that a major disaster exists in the States of North & South Carolina. Following the recent disaster declaration for individual assistance issued by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the IRS announced today that affected taxpayers in certain counties will receive tax relief.

Individuals in South Carolina who reside or have a business in Chesterfield, Dillon, Georgetown, Horry, Marion and Marlboro counties may qualify for tax relief.

Individuals in North Carolina who reside or have a business in Beaufort, Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Duplin, Greene, Harnett, Hoke, Hyde, Johnson, Lee, Lenoir, Jones, Moore, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Pitt, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson, Scotland, Wayne and Wilson counties may qualify for tax relief.

The declaration permits the IRS to postpone certain deadlines for taxpayers who reside or have a business in the disaster area. For instance, certain deadlines falling on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Jan. 31, 2019, are granted additional time to file through Jan. 31, 2019. This includes taxpayers who had a valid extension to file their 2017 return due to run out on Oct. 15, 2018. It also includes the quarterly estimated income tax payments due on Sept. 17, 2018 and Jan. 15, 2019, and the quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due on Oct. 31, 2018. It also includes tax-exempt organizations that operate on a calendar-year basis and had an automatic extension due to run out on Nov. 15, 2018.

In addition, penalties on payroll and excise tax deposits due on or after Sept. 8, 2018, and before Sept. 24, 2018, will be abated as long as the deposits are made by Sept. 24, 2018.

If an affected taxpayer receives a late filing or late payment penalty notice from the IRS that has an original or extended filing, payment or deposit due date that falls within the postponement period, the taxpayer should call the telephone number on the notice to have the IRS abate the penalty.

The IRS automatically identifies taxpayers located in the covered disaster area and applies automatic filing and payment relief. But affected taxpayers who reside or have a business located outside the covered disaster area must call the IRS disaster hotline at 866-562-5227 to request this tax relief.

Covered Disaster Area

The counties listed above constitute a covered disaster area for purposes of Treas. Reg. §301.7508A-1(d)(2) and are entitled to the relief detailed below.

Affected Taxpayers

Taxpayers considered to be affected taxpayers eligible for the postponement of time to file returns, pay taxes and perform other time-sensitive acts are those taxpayers listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(d)(1), and include individuals who live, and businesses (including tax-exempt organizations) whose principal place of business is located, in the covered disaster area. Taxpayers not in the covered disaster area, but whose records necessary to meet a deadline listed in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c) are in the covered disaster area, are also entitled to relief. In addition, all relief workers affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization assisting in the relief activities in the covered disaster area and any individual visiting the covered disaster area who was killed or injured as a result of the disaster are entitled to relief.

Grant of Relief

Under section 7508A, the IRS gives affected taxpayers until Jan. 31, 2019, to file most tax returns (including individual, corporate, and estate and trust income tax returns; partnership returns, S corporation returns, and trust returns; estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax returns; and employment and certain excise tax returns annual information returns of tax-exempt organizations; and employment and certain excise tax returns), that have either an original or extended due date occurring on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Jan. 31, 2019.

Affected taxpayers that have an estimated income tax payment originally due on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Jan. 31, 2019, will not be subject to penalties for failure to pay estimated tax installments as long as such payments are paid on or before Jan. 31, 2019. The IRS also gives affected taxpayers until Jan. 31, 2019 to perform other time-sensitive actions described in Treas. Reg. § 301.7508A-1(c)(1) and Rev. Proc. 2007-56, 2007-34 I.R.B. 388 (Aug. 20, 2007), that are due to be performed on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Jan. 31, 2019.

This relief also includes the filing of Form 5500 series returns, (that were required to be filed on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Jan. 31, 2019, in the manner described in section 8 of Rev. Proc. 2007-56. The relief described in section 17 of Rev. Proc. 2007-56, pertaining to like-kind exchanges of property, also applies to certain taxpayers who are not otherwise affected taxpayers and may include acts required to be performed before or after the period above.

Unless an act is specifically listed in Rev. Proc. 2007-56, the postponement of time to file and pay does not apply to information returns in the W-2, 1094, 1095, 1097, 1098, or 1099 series; to Forms 1042-S, 3921, 3922 or 8027; or to employment and excise tax deposits.  However, penalties on deposits due on or after Sept. 8, 2018 and before Sept. 24, 2018, will be abated as long as the tax deposits were made by Sept. 24, 2018.

Casualty Losses

Affected taxpayers in a federally declared disaster area have the option of claiming disaster-related casualty losses on their federal income tax return for either the year in which the event occurred, or the prior year. See Publication 547 for details.

Individuals may deduct personal property losses that are not covered by insurance or other reimbursements. For details, see Form 4684, Casualties and Thefts and its Instructions.

Affected taxpayers claiming the disaster loss on a 2017 return should put the Disaster Designation, “South Carolina, Hurricane Florence” at the top of the form so that the IRS can expedite the processing of the refund.

Other Relief

The IRS will waive the usual fees and expedite requests for copies of previously filed tax returns for affected taxpayers. Taxpayers should put the assigned Disaster Designation “South Carolina, Hurricane Florence” in red ink at the top of Form 4506, Request for Copy of Tax Return, or Form 4506-T, Request for Transcript of Tax Return, as appropriate, and submit it to the IRS.

Affected taxpayers who are contacted by the IRS on a collection or examination matter should explain how the disaster impacts them so that the IRS can provide appropriate consideration to their case. Taxpayers may download forms and publications from the official IRS website, irs.gov, or order them by calling 800-829-3676. The IRS toll-free number for general tax questions is 800-829-1040.

As always, Tax On Wheels, LLC is available to assist taxpayers with all tax filing needs.  Tax On Wheels, LLC can be reached by calling 803 732-4288.

IRS provides tax relief for victims of Hurricane Florence

September 15, 2018

WASHINGTON — Hurricane Florence victims in parts of North Carolina and elsewhere have until Jan. 31, 2019, to file certain individual and business tax returns and make certain tax payments, the Internal Revenue Service announced today.

The IRS is offering this relief to any area designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as qualifying for individual assistance. Currently, this only includes parts of North Carolina, but taxpayers in localities added later to the disaster area, including those in other states, will automatically receive the same filing and payment relief. The current list of eligible localities is always available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov.

The tax relief postpones various tax filing and payment deadlines that occurred starting on Sept. 7, 2018 in North Carolina. As a result, affected individuals and businesses will have until Jan. 31, 2019, to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period.

This includes quarterly estimated income tax payments due on Sept. 17, 2018, and the quarterly payroll and excise tax returns normally due on Sept. 30, 2018. Businesses with extensions also have the additional time including, among others, calendar-year partnerships whose 2017 extensions run out on Sept. 17, 2018. Taxpayers who had a valid extension to file their 2017 return due to run out on Oct. 15, 2018 will also have more time to file.

In addition, penalties on payroll and excise tax deposits due on or after Sept. 7, 2018, and before Sept. 24, 2018, will be abated as long as the deposits are made by Sept. 24, 2018.

The IRS disaster relief page has details on other returns, payments and tax-related actions qualifying for the additional time.

The IRS automatically provides filing and penalty relief to any taxpayer with an IRS address of record located in the disaster area. Thus, taxpayers need not contact the IRS to get this relief. However, if an affected taxpayer receives a late filing or late payment penalty notice from the IRS that has an original or extended filing, payment or deposit due date falling within the postponement period, the taxpayer should call the number on the notice to have the penalty abated.

In addition, the IRS will work with any taxpayer who lives outside the disaster area but whose records necessary to meet a deadline occurring during the postponement period are located in the affected area. Taxpayers qualifying for relief who live outside the disaster area need to contact the IRS at 866-562-5227. This also includes workers assisting the relief activities who are affiliated with a recognized government or philanthropic organization.

Individuals and businesses in a federally declared disaster area who suffered uninsured or unreimbursed disaster-related losses can choose to claim them on either the return for the year the loss occurred (in this instance, the 2018 return normally filed next year), or the return for the prior year (2017). See Publication 547 for details.

The tax relief is part of a coordinated federal response to the damage caused by severe storms and flooding and is based on local damage assessments by FEMA. For information on disaster recovery, visit disasterassistance.gov.

Please feel free to contact Tax On Wheels, LLC at 803 732-4288 if you need assistance in meeting your tax filing obligations.

Taxpayers should know the telltale signs of a scam

June 5, 2018

Many taxpayers recently filed their taxes and may be waiting for a response from the IRS. Because of this summertime tends to be a period when thieves increase their scam attempts. They try to get people to disclose personal information like Social Security numbers, account information and passwords.

To avoid becoming a victim, taxpayers should remember these telltale signs of a scam:

The IRS and its authorized private collection agencies will never:

  • Call to demand immediate payment using a specific method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer. Generally, the IRS will first mail a bill to any taxpayer who owes taxes. All tax payments should only be made payable to the U.S. Treasury. Taxpayers should never make checks out to third parties.
  • Threaten to immediately bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have the taxpayer arrested for not paying.
  • Demand that taxes be paid without giving the taxpayer the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Use email, text messages or social media to discuss personal tax issues, such as those involving bills or refunds.

For anyone who doesn’t owe taxes and has no reason to think they do, they should:

For anyone who owes tax or thinks they do, they can:

  • View tax account information online at IRS.gov to see the actual amount owed. Taxpayers can then also review their payment options.
  • Call the number on the billing notice.
  • Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help.

More information:

Tax On Wheels, LLC is always available to assist you if you have questions or concerns about being contacted by any taxing authority, including the Internal Revenue Service.  Please feel free to give us a call at 803 732-4288 if we can be of assistance to you.

The Right to Retain Representation: Taxpayer Bill of Rights #9

April 19, 2018

The right to retain representation when dealing with the IRS is one of ten rights in the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Taxpayers who interact with the IRS should be aware of their rights.

The right to representation means:

  • Taxpayers have the right to retain an authorized representative of their choice to represent them in their dealings with the IRS.
  • Taxpayers who are heading to an interview with the IRS may select someone to represent them.
  • Taxpayers who retain representation don’t have to attend with their representative, unless the IRS formally summons them to appear.
  • In most situations, the IRS must suspend an interview if the taxpayer requests to consult with a representative, such as an attorney, certified public accountant or enrolled agent.
  • Any attorney, CPA, enrolled agent, enrolled actuary or other person permitted to represent a taxpayer before the IRS, who’s not disbarred or suspended from practice before the IRS, may submit a written power of attorney to represent a taxpayer before the IRS.
  • Taxpayers have the right to seek assistance from a Low Income Taxpayer Clinic if they cannot afford representation.
  • Taxpayers with income below a certain level may ask an LITC to represent them in their tax dispute before the IRS or a federal court. Help from an LITC can be free or for a minimal fee. Many LITCs offer services in languages other than English. Although LITCs receive partial funding from the IRS, they and their employees and volunteers are completely independent of the IRS.

As an enrolled agent, I am enrolled to practice before the IRS and can assist you with all matters pending before the IRS. When you get THE LETTER, give Tax On Wheels, LLC a call at 803 732-4288 so we can assist you in resolving your tax issues.

More Information:
Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer
Taxpayer Advocate Service

#IRSTaxTip: The Right to Retain Representation: Taxpayer Bill of Rights #9 https://go.usa.gov/xQbnA

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What Taxpayers Should do When They Need More Time to Pay

April 16, 2018

All taxpayers should file their taxes on time, even if they can’t pay what they owe. This saves them from a potential failure-to-file penalty. While taxes are due by the original due date of the return, some taxpayers are unable to pay them by the deadline.

Here are some tips for those who can’t pay their taxes in full by the April 17 deadline:

  • File on Time and Pay as Much as Possible. Taxpayers can pay online, by phone, by check or money order, or with their mobile device using the IRS2Go app.
  • Get a Loan or Use a Credit Card to Pay the Tax. The interest and fees charged by a bank or credit card company may be less than IRS interest and penalties.
  • Use the Online Payment Agreement tool. Taxpayers should not wait for the IRS to send a bill before setting up a payment plan. The best way to do this is to use the Online Payment Agreement tool. Taxpayers can also file an Installment Agreement Request with their return and set up a direct debit agreement, eliminating the need to send a check each month.
  • Don’t Ignore a Tax Bill. The IRS may take collection action against taxpayers who don’t respond to notices. Taxpayers should contact the IRS right away by calling the phone number on their bills to talk about options. The IRS will work with taxpayers suffering financial hardship.

IRS YouTube Videos:
Owe Taxes But Can’t Pay? – English | Spanish | ASL

#IRSTaxTip: What Taxpayers Should do When They Need More Time to Pay https://go.usa.gov/xQbnG

Tips for Taxpayers Who Owe Taxes

June 25, 2017

The IRS offers a variety of payment options where taxpayers can pay immediately or arrange to pay in installments. Those who receive a bill from the IRS should not ignore it. A delay may cost more in the end. As more time passes, the more interest and penalties accumulate.

Here are some ways to make payments using IRS electronic payment options:

  • Direct Pay. Pay tax bills directly from a checking or savings account free with IRS Direct Pay. Taxpayers receive instant confirmation once they’ve made a payment. With Direct Pay, taxpayers can schedule payments up to 30 days in advance. Change or cancel a payment two business days before the scheduled payment date.
  • Credit or Debit Cards. Taxpayers can also pay their taxes by debit or credit card online, by phone or with a mobile device. A payment processor will process payments.  The IRS does not charge a fee but convenience fees apply and vary by processor.

Those wishing to use a mobile devise can access the IRS2Go app to pay with either Direct Pay or debit or credit card. IRS2Go is the official mobile app of the IRS. Download IRS2Go from Google Play, the Apple App Store or the Amazon App Store.

  • Installment Agreement. Taxpayers, who are unable to pay their tax debt immediately, may be able to make monthly payments. Before applying for any payment agreement, taxpayers must file all required tax returns. Apply for an installment agreement with the Online Payment Agreement tool.

Who’s eligible to apply for a monthly installment agreement online?

    • Individuals who owe $50,000 or less in combined  tax, penalties and interest and have filed all required returns
    • Businesses that owe $25,000 or less in combined tax, penalties and interest for the current year or last year’s liabilities and have filed all required returns

Those who owe taxes are reminded to pay as much as they can as soon as possible to minimize interest and penalties. Visit IRS.gov/payments for all payment options.

IRS YouTube Videos:

You can find this information on Tips for Taxpayers Who Owe Taxes on The IRS Website by clicking this link — #IRSTaxTip

Please feel free to contact Tax On Wheels, LLC if we can be of assistance to you.  We can be reached at 803 732-4288

IRS Offers Last-Minute Tips for Those Who Haven’t Filed

IRS YouTube Videos:

WASHINGTON –The federal income tax filing deadline has arrived and the IRS estimates it will receive approximately 12 million 2016 federal income tax returns and nearly 8.4 million extension requests in the final days of the filing season.

For those taxpayers who have yet to file, the IRS offers this advice:

  • E-file The IRS encourages taxpayers to file electronically. E-file vastly reduces tax return errors, as the tax software does the calculations, flags common errors and prompts taxpayers for missing information. Free File partners make their brand-name software products available for free to taxpayers earning $64,000 or less. Taxpayers who earned more may use Free File Fillable Forms. For the first time, taxpayers also can prepare their taxes from their mobile phone or tablet as well as computer. Taxpayers who changed tax software products, either using Free File or other software products, this year may be asked for their Adjusted Gross Income to verify their identity. See Validating Your Electronically Filed Tax Return for details.
  • Refunds The fastest way for taxpayers to get their refund is to e-file and have it electronically deposited into their bank or other financial account. The IRS issues more than nine out of 10 refunds in less than 21 days. Taxpayers waiting to receive their refunds can use the “Where’s My Refund?” tool on IRS.gov or check the status of their refund through the smartphone app, IRS2Go. The “Where’s My Refund?” tool is updated once daily, usually overnight, so there’s no reason to check more than once per day or call the IRS to get information about a refund. Taxpayers can check “Where’s My Refund?” within 24 hours after the IRS has received an e-filed return or four weeks after receipt of a mailed paper return. “Where’s My Refund?” has a tracker that displays progress through three stages: (1) Return Received, (2) Refund Approved and (3) Refund Sent.
  • Payment Options Many taxpayers who owe money often wait until the last minute to file. Taxpayers who owe have many payment options. They can pay online, by phone or with their mobile device using the IRS2Go app. Available payment options include Direct Pay; Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS); electronic funds withdrawal; same-day wire; debit or credit card; check or money order; or cash. Some of these options are free; others require a fee.
  • File an Extension Taxpayers who are not ready to file by the deadline should request an extension. An extension gives the taxpayer until Oct. 16 to file but does not extend the time to pay. Interest and penalties will be charged on all taxes not paid by the April 18 filing deadline. Although some people automatically get an extension – such as those in a federally declared disaster area – most people need to request one. One way to get an extension is through Free File on IRS.gov where some partners offer free electronic filing of the extension request. Extensions are free for everyone, regardless of income. Another option for taxpayers is to pay electronically to get an extension. IRS will automatically process an extension when taxpayers select Form 4868 and they are making a full or partial federal tax payment using Direct Pay, Electronic Federal Tax Payment System or a debit or credit card by the April due date. There is no need to file a separate Form 4868 when making an electronic payment and indicating it is for a 4868 or extension. Electronic payment options are available at IRS.gov/payments. Taxpayers can also download, print and file a paper Form 4868 from IRS.gov/forms. The form must be mailed to the IRS with a postmark on or before midnight on April 18.
  • Penalties and Interest Taxpayers who are thinking of missing the filing deadline because they can’t pay all of the taxes they owe should consider filing and paying what they can to lessen interest and penalties. Penalties for those who owe tax and fail to file either a tax return or an extension request by April 18 can be higher than if they had filed and not paid the taxes they owed. That’s because the failure-to-file penalty is generally 5 percent per month and can be as much as 25 percent of the unpaid tax, depending on how late a taxpayer files. The failure-to-pay penalty, which is the penalty for any taxes not paid by the deadline, is ½ of 1 percent of the unpaid taxes per month. The failure-to-pay penalty continues to accrue on any unpaid tax balance and can be up to 25 percent of the unpaid amount. Taxpayers must also pay interest, currently at the annual rate of 4 percent, compounded daily, on taxes not paid by the filing deadline.
  • Installment Agreements Taxpayers who find they are unable to pay the entire amount of taxes due should consider filing the return and requesting a payment agreement. Most people can set up a payment plan with the IRS online in a matter of minutes. Those who owe $50,000 or less in combined tax, penalties and interest can use the Online Payment Agreement application to set up a short-term payment plan of 120-days or less, or a monthly payment agreement for up to 72 months. With the Online Payment Agreement, no paperwork is required, there is no need to call, write or visit the IRS and qualified taxpayers can avoid the IRS filing a Notice of Federal Tax Lien unless it previously filed one. Alternatively, taxpayers can request a payment agreement by filing Form 9465. This form can be downloaded from IRS.gov and mailed along with a tax return, IRS bill or notice.

No matter how or when they file, taxpayers are reminded to keep a copy of their tax return and all supporting documents.

And if all of that is too much to bear, remember, Tax On Wheels, LLC will be glad to handle it all for you.  Just give us a call at 803 732-4288.

Time Running Out to Claim $1 Billion in Tax Refunds from 2013

March 3 2017

Taxpayers who did not file a tax return for 2013 may be one of the nearly 1 million who may be due a refund from that year. Taxpayers must claim their part of almost $1 billion by this year’s April 18 tax deadline. To claim a refund, taxpayers must file a 2013 federal income tax return. Here are some facts about unclaimed refunds:

  • The unclaimed refunds apply to people who did not file a federal income tax return for 2013. The IRS estimates that half the potential refunds are more than $763.
  • Some people, such as students and part-time workers, may not have filed because they had too little income to require them to file a tax return. They may have a refund waiting if they had taxes withheld from their wages or made quarterly estimated payments. A refund could also apply if they qualify for certain tax credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit.
  • The law generally provides a three-year window to claim a tax refund. For 2013 returns, the window closes on April 18, 2017.
  • The law requires that taxpayers properly address, mail and postmark their tax returns by April 18, 2017, to claim their refund.
  • After three years, unclaimed refunds become property of the U.S. Treasury. There is no penalty for filing a late return if taxpayers are due a refund.
  • The IRS may hold 2013 refunds if taxpayers have not filed tax returns for 2014 and 2015. The U.S. Treasury will apply the refund to any federal or state tax owed. Refunds may also be held  to offset unpaid child support or past due federal debts such as student loans.
  • Taxpayers who are missing Forms W-2, 1098, 1099 or 5498 for prior years should ask for copies from employers, banks or other payers. Taxpayers unable to get these copies can request a wage and income transcript either online or by mail.  Taxpayers can also file Form 4506-T to get a transcript.
  • The three-year window also usually applies to a refund from an amended return. In general, you must file Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, within three years from the date you filed your original tax return. You can also file it within two years from the date you paid the tax, if that date is later than the three-year rule. That means the deadline for most people to amend their 2013 tax return and claim a refund will expire on April 18, 2017.

Current and prior year tax forms and instructions are available on IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Filing prior year returns can be tricky. Amending returns for any year can be downright confusing.  This is not something most people will want to undertake on their own.  Let us help you.  If you would like to receive assistance in claiming your prior year refunds or amending any return just give Tax On Wheels, LLC a call at 803 732-4288.  We specialize in bringing taxpayers up to date on their tax filings.

Additional IRS Resources:

IRS YouTube Videos:

Tutorial on the basics of South Carolina taxation

The South Carolina Department of Revenue has published on its website a basic tutorial on South Carolina taxation.  For the do it your selfer or those new to South Carolina taxation, this could be a very useful tool to help you complete your tax return.

The tutorial can be found here

Of course, for those who prefer to have someone else prepare their tax return, Tax On Wheels, LLC is available year round to assist you. We can be reached at 803 732-4288.

Include a Few Tax Items in Your Summer Wedding Checklist

June 29, 2015

If you’re preparing for summer nuptials, make sure you do some tax planning as well. A few steps taken now can make tax time easier next year. Here are some tips from the IRS to help keep tax issues that may arise from your marriage to a minimum:

  • Change of name. All the names and Social Security numbers on your tax return must match your Social Security Administration records. If you change your name, report it to the SSA. To do that, file Form SS-5, Application for a Social Security Card. The easiest way for you to get the form is to download and print it on SSA.gov. You can also call SSA at 800-772-1213 to order the form, or get it from your local SSA office.
  • Change tax withholding. When you get married, you should consider a change of income tax withholding. To do that, give your employer a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. The withholding rate for married people is lower than for those who are single. Some married people find that they do not have enough tax withheld at the married rate. For example, this can happen if you and your spouse both work. Use the IRS Withholding Calculator tool at IRS.gov to help you complete a new Form W-4. See Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax, for more information. You can get IRS forms and publications on IRS.gov/forms at any time.
  • Changes in circumstances. If you receive advance payments of the premium tax credit you should report changes in circumstances, such as your marriage, to your Health Insurance Marketplace. Other changes that you should report include a change in your income or family size. Advance payments of the premium tax credit provide financial assistance to help you pay for the insurance you buy through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Reporting changes in circumstances will allow the Marketplace to adjust your advance credit payments. This adjustment will help you avoid getting a smaller refund or owing money that you did not expect to owe on your federal tax return.
  • Change of address. Let the IRS know if you move. To do that, file Form 8822, Change of Address, with the IRS. You should also notify the U.S. Postal Service. You can change your address online at USPS.com, or report the change at your local post office.
  • Change in filing status. If you are married as of Dec. 31, that is your marital status for the entire year for tax purposes. You and your spouse can choose to file your federal tax return jointly or separately each year. It is a good idea to figure the tax both ways so you can choose the status that results in the least tax.

Even if you don’t have room on your guest list for us, still make sure you give us a call at 803 732-4288 so we can help you with all the tax items on your check list.  Tax On Wheels, LLC specializes in helping new couples coordinate their finances so there’s one less thing for you to worry about.

IRS YouTube Videos:

IRS Podcasts: