Tag Archives: Balance Due

IRS automatically waives estimated tax penalty for eligible 2018 tax filers

August 14, 2019

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service is automatically waiving the estimated tax penalty for the more than 400,000 eligible taxpayers who already filed their 2018 federal income tax returns but did not claim the waiver.

The IRS will apply this waiver to tax accounts of all eligible taxpayers, so there is no need to contact the IRS to apply for or request the waiver.

Earlier this year, the IRS lowered the usual 90% penalty threshold to 80% to help taxpayers whose withholding and estimated tax payments fell short of their total 2018 tax liability. The agency also removed the requirement that estimated tax payments be made in four equal installments, as long as they were all made by Jan. 15, 2019. The 90% threshold was initially lowered to 85% on Jan 16 and further lowered to 80% on March 22.

The automatic waiver applies to any individual taxpayer who paid at least 80% of their total tax liability through federal income tax withholding or quarterly estimated tax payments but did not claim the special waiver available to them when they filed their 2018 return earlier this year.

“The IRS is taking this step to help affected taxpayers,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “This waiver is designed to provide relief to any person who filed too early to take advantage of the waiver or was unaware of it when they filed.”

Refunds planned for eligible taxpayers who paid penalty
Over the next few months, the IRS will mail copies of notices CP 21 granting this relief to affected taxpayers. Any eligible taxpayer who already paid the penalty will also receive a refund check about three weeks after their CP21 notice regardless if they requested penalty relief. The agency emphasized that eligible taxpayers who have already filed a 2018 return do not need to request penalty relief, contact the IRS or take any other action to receive this relief.

For those yet to file, the IRS urges every eligible taxpayer to claim the waiver on their return. This includes those with tax-filing extensions due to run out on Oct. 15, 2019. The quickest and easiest way is to file electronically and take advantage of the waiver computation built into their tax software package. Those who choose to file on paper can fill out Form 2210 and attach it to their 2018 return. See the instructions to Form 2210 for details.

Because the U.S. tax system is pay-as-you-go, taxpayers are required by law to pay most of their tax obligation during the year, rather than at the end of the year. This can be done by having tax withheld from paychecks, pension payments or Social Security benefits, making estimated tax payments or a combination of these methods.

Like last year, the IRS urges everyone to do a “Paycheck Checkup” and review their withholding for 2019. This is especially important for anyone who faced an unexpected tax bill or a penalty when they filed this year. It’s also an important step for those who made withholding adjustments in 2018 or had a major life change. Those most at risk of having too little tax withheld include those who itemized in the past but now take the increased standard deduction, as well as two wage earner households, employees with nonwage sources of income and those with complex tax situations.

To get started, check out the new Tax Withholding Estimator, available on IRS.gov. More information about tax withholding and estimated tax can be found on the agency’s Pay As You Go web page, as well as in Publication 505.

As always, please feel free to contact Tax On Wheels, LLC at 803 732-4288 if we can be of assistance to you with any tax matter.

 

Individuals who need passports should promptly resolve IRS tax debt

February 27, 2019

WASHINGTON ― The Internal Revenue Service today reiterated its warning that taxpayers may not be able to renew a current passport or obtain a new passport if they owe federal taxes. To avoid delays in travel plans, taxpayers need to take prompt action to resolve their tax issues.

In January of last year, the IRS began implementing new procedures affecting individuals with “seriously delinquent tax debts.” These new procedures implement provisions of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The law requires the IRS to notify the State Department of taxpayers the IRS has certified as owing a seriously delinquent tax debt, which is $52,000 or more. The law also requires State to deny their passport application or renewal. If a taxpayer currently has a valid passport, the State Department may revoke the passport or limit ability to travel outside the United States.

When the IRS certifies a taxpayer to the State Department as owing a seriously delinquent tax debt, they receive a Notice CP508C from the IRS. The notice explains what steps a taxpayer needs to take to resolve the debt. Please note, the IRS doesn’t send copies of the notice to powers of attorney. IRS telephone assistors can help taxpayers resolve the debt, for example, they can help taxpayers set up a payment plan or make them aware of other payment alternatives. Taxpayers shouldn’t delay because some resolutions take longer than others, such as adjusting a prior tax assessment.

When a taxpayer no longer has a seriously delinquent tax debt, because they paid it in full or made another payment arrangement, the IRS will reverse the taxpayer’s certification within thirty days. State will then remove the certification from the taxpayer’s record, so their passport won’t be at risk under this program. The IRS can expedite the decertification notice to the State Department for a taxpayer who resolves their debt, has a pending passport application and has imminent travel plans or lives abroad with an urgent need for a passport.

A taxpayer with a seriously delinquent tax debt is generally someone who owes the IRS more than $52,000 in back taxes, penalties and interest for which the IRS has filed a Notice of Federal Tax Lien and the period to challenge it has expired or the IRS has issued a levy.

Before denying a passport renewal or new passport application, the State Department will hold the taxpayer’s application for 90 days to allow them to:

  • Resolve any erroneous certification issues,
  • Make full payment of the tax debt, or
  • Enter a satisfactory payment arrangement with the IRS.

Ways to Resolve Tax Issues

There are several ways taxpayers can avoid having the IRS notify the State Department of their seriously delinquent tax debt. They include the following:

  • Paying the tax debt in full,
  • Paying the tax debt timely under an approved installment agreement,
  • Paying the tax debt timely under an accepted offer in compromise,
  • Paying the tax debt timely under the terms of a settlement agreement with the Department of Justice,
  • Having requested or have a pending collection due process appeal with a levy, or
  • Having collection suspended because a taxpayer has made an innocent spouse election or requested innocent spouse relief.

Relief programs for unpaid taxes

Frequently, taxpayers qualify for one of several relief programs including the following:

  • Payment agreement. Taxpayers can ask for a payment plan with the IRS by filing Form 9465. Taxpayers can download this form from IRS.gov and mail it along with a tax return, bill or notice. Some taxpayers can use the online payment agreement to set up a monthly payment agreement.
  • Offer in compromise. Some taxpayers may qualify for an offer in compromise, an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that settles the tax liability for less than the full amount owed. The IRS looks at the taxpayer’s income and assets to decide the taxpayer’s ability to pay. Taxpayers can use the Offer in Compromise Pre-Qualifier tool to help them decide whether they’re eligible for an offer in compromise.

Subject to change, the IRS also will not certify a taxpayer as owing a seriously delinquent tax debt or will reverse the certification for a taxpayer:

  • Who is in bankruptcy,
  • Who is deceased,
  • Who is identified by the IRS as a victim of tax-related identity theft,
  • Whose account the IRS has determined is currently not collectible due to hardship,
  • Who is located within a federally declared disaster area,
  • Who has a request pending with the IRS for an installment agreement,
  • Who has a pending offer in compromise with the IRS, or
  • Who has an IRS accepted adjustment that will satisfy the debt in full.

For taxpayers serving in a combat zone who owe a seriously delinquent tax debt, the IRS postpones notifying the State Department of the delinquency and the taxpayer’s passport is not subject to denial during the time of service in a combat zone.

For more on these procedures and the law visit IRS.gov. The IRS first announced this matter in IRS news release IR-2018-7 on Jan. 16, 2018.

If you need help resolving an IRS tax debt issue, give us a call at 803 732-4288 to see how we can help.

Taxpayers should know the telltale signs of a scam

June 5, 2018

Many taxpayers recently filed their taxes and may be waiting for a response from the IRS. Because of this summertime tends to be a period when thieves increase their scam attempts. They try to get people to disclose personal information like Social Security numbers, account information and passwords.

To avoid becoming a victim, taxpayers should remember these telltale signs of a scam:

The IRS and its authorized private collection agencies will never:

  • Call to demand immediate payment using a specific method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer. Generally, the IRS will first mail a bill to any taxpayer who owes taxes. All tax payments should only be made payable to the U.S. Treasury. Taxpayers should never make checks out to third parties.
  • Threaten to immediately bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have the taxpayer arrested for not paying.
  • Demand that taxes be paid without giving the taxpayer the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Use email, text messages or social media to discuss personal tax issues, such as those involving bills or refunds.

For anyone who doesn’t owe taxes and has no reason to think they do, they should:

For anyone who owes tax or thinks they do, they can:

  • View tax account information online at IRS.gov to see the actual amount owed. Taxpayers can then also review their payment options.
  • Call the number on the billing notice.
  • Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help.

More information:

Tax On Wheels, LLC is always available to assist you if you have questions or concerns about being contacted by any taxing authority, including the Internal Revenue Service.  Please feel free to give us a call at 803 732-4288 if we can be of assistance to you.

IRS now billing those who filed but didn’t pay; Many payment options available

May 29, 2018

IRS YouTube Videos:

Easy Ways to Pay My IRS TaxesEnglish | Spanish | ASL

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today advised those now receiving tax bills because they filed on time but didn’t pay in full that there are many easy options for paying what they owe to the IRS.

If a tax return was filed but the balance due remains unpaid, the taxpayer will receive a letter or notice in the mail from the IRS, usually within a few weeks. These notices, including the CP14 and CP501, both of which notify taxpayers that they have a balance due, are frequently mailed in the months of June and July.

How to pay

Taxpayers may pay taxes by electronic funds transfer, credit card, check, money order or cash:

  • Taxpayers can use Direct Pay to pay directly from a checking or savings account. This service is free.
  • Taxpayers can take advantage of the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS) to pay by phone or online. EFTPS® is a free service of the U.S. Department of Treasury.
  • Taxpayers may also initiate a debit or credit card payment. The IRS doesn’t charge a fee for this service but the processing company may. Fees vary by company.
  • Taxpayers may pay by check or money order made payable to the United States Treasury (or U.S. Treasury) either in person or through the mail.
  • Taxpayers should not send cash through the mail. They can pay cash at some IRS offices or at a participating PayNearMe location. Some restrictions apply.

Taxpayers who are unable to pay what they owe should contact the IRS as soon as possible. Several payment options are available including:

  • Online Payment Agreement — Individuals who owe $50,000 or less in combined income tax, penalties and interest and businesses that owe $25,000 or less in payroll tax and have filed all tax returns may qualify for an Online Payment Agreement. Most taxpayers qualify for this option, and an agreement can usually be set up in a matter of minutes. Online applications to establish tax payment plans, like online payment agreements and installment agreements, are available Monday – Friday., 6 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.; Saturday., 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m. to midnight.
  • Installment Agreement — Installment agreements paid by direct deposit from a bank account or a payroll deduction will help taxpayers avoid default on their agreements. It also reduces the burden of mailing payments and saves postage costs. Taxpayers who don’t qualify for a payment agreement may still pay by installment. Certain fees apply.
  • Delaying Collection — If the IRS determines a taxpayer is unable to pay, it may delay collection until the taxpayer’s financial condition improves.
  • Offer in Compromise — Some struggling taxpayers qualify to settle their tax bill for less than the amount they owe by submitting an offer in compromise. To help determine eligibility, use the Offer in Compromise Pre-Qualifier tool.

In addition, taxpayers can consider other options for payment, including getting a loan to pay the amount due. In many cases, loan costs may be lower than the combination of interest and penalties the IRS must charge under federal law.

Even if a taxpayer works out a payment solution with the IRS, the agency may still need to file a Notice of Federal Tax Lien to secure the government’s interest. Federal law requires the lien to establish priority as a creditor in competition with other creditors in certain situations, such as bankruptcy proceedings or sales of real estate. Once the IRS files a lien, it may appear on a taxpayer’s credit report and harm their credit rating. Therefore, it’s important that they work to resolve a tax liability as quickly as possible before lien filing becomes necessary. Once the IRS files a lien, the agency generally cannot issue a Certificate of Release of Federal Tax Lien until the taxpayer pays taxes, penalties, interest and recording fees in full.

Stay current

Taxpayers can take steps now to make sure they don’t fall behind on their taxes in the future. The IRS encourages several key groups of taxpayers to perform a “paycheck checkup” to check if they are having the right amount of tax withholding following recent tax-law changes.

Employees can increase their tax withholding by filling out a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, and giving it to their employer. To have more tax withheld, claim fewer withholding allowances or ask the employer to take out a fixed amount of additional tax each pay period. To help figure the right amount to withhold, use the IRS Withholding Calculator  on IRS.gov.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted in December 2017, changed the way tax is calculated for most taxpayers, including those with substantial income not subject to withholding. Among other things, the new law changed the tax rates and brackets, revised business expense deductions, increased the standard deduction, removed personal exemptions, increased the child tax credit and limited or discontinued certain deductions. As a result, many taxpayers may need to raise or lower the amount of tax they pay each quarter through the estimated tax system.

The newly revised estimated tax package, Form 1040-ES, now available on IRS.gov, is designed to help taxpayers figure these payments correctly. Among other things, the package includes a quick rundown of key tax changes, income tax rate schedules for 2018 and a useful worksheet for figuring the right amount to pay. The IRS also mailed 1 million Form 1040-ES vouchers with instructions in late March to taxpayers who used the Form 1040-ES last year.

For more information, see Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax.

As always, you should contact Tax On Wheels, LLC at 803 732-4288 if you need assistance in dealing with the IRS or arranging payments on a tax bill.  We are here to help you.

What Taxpayers Should do When They Need More Time to Pay

April 16, 2018

All taxpayers should file their taxes on time, even if they can’t pay what they owe. This saves them from a potential failure-to-file penalty. While taxes are due by the original due date of the return, some taxpayers are unable to pay them by the deadline.

Here are some tips for those who can’t pay their taxes in full by the April 17 deadline:

  • File on Time and Pay as Much as Possible. Taxpayers can pay online, by phone, by check or money order, or with their mobile device using the IRS2Go app.
  • Get a Loan or Use a Credit Card to Pay the Tax. The interest and fees charged by a bank or credit card company may be less than IRS interest and penalties.
  • Use the Online Payment Agreement tool. Taxpayers should not wait for the IRS to send a bill before setting up a payment plan. The best way to do this is to use the Online Payment Agreement tool. Taxpayers can also file an Installment Agreement Request with their return and set up a direct debit agreement, eliminating the need to send a check each month.
  • Don’t Ignore a Tax Bill. The IRS may take collection action against taxpayers who don’t respond to notices. Taxpayers should contact the IRS right away by calling the phone number on their bills to talk about options. The IRS will work with taxpayers suffering financial hardship.

IRS YouTube Videos:
Owe Taxes But Can’t Pay? – English | Spanish | ASL

#IRSTaxTip: What Taxpayers Should do When They Need More Time to Pay https://go.usa.gov/xQbnG

Tips for Taxpayers Who Owe Taxes

June 25, 2017

The IRS offers a variety of payment options where taxpayers can pay immediately or arrange to pay in installments. Those who receive a bill from the IRS should not ignore it. A delay may cost more in the end. As more time passes, the more interest and penalties accumulate.

Here are some ways to make payments using IRS electronic payment options:

  • Direct Pay. Pay tax bills directly from a checking or savings account free with IRS Direct Pay. Taxpayers receive instant confirmation once they’ve made a payment. With Direct Pay, taxpayers can schedule payments up to 30 days in advance. Change or cancel a payment two business days before the scheduled payment date.
  • Credit or Debit Cards. Taxpayers can also pay their taxes by debit or credit card online, by phone or with a mobile device. A payment processor will process payments.  The IRS does not charge a fee but convenience fees apply and vary by processor.

Those wishing to use a mobile devise can access the IRS2Go app to pay with either Direct Pay or debit or credit card. IRS2Go is the official mobile app of the IRS. Download IRS2Go from Google Play, the Apple App Store or the Amazon App Store.

  • Installment Agreement. Taxpayers, who are unable to pay their tax debt immediately, may be able to make monthly payments. Before applying for any payment agreement, taxpayers must file all required tax returns. Apply for an installment agreement with the Online Payment Agreement tool.

Who’s eligible to apply for a monthly installment agreement online?

    • Individuals who owe $50,000 or less in combined  tax, penalties and interest and have filed all required returns
    • Businesses that owe $25,000 or less in combined tax, penalties and interest for the current year or last year’s liabilities and have filed all required returns

Those who owe taxes are reminded to pay as much as they can as soon as possible to minimize interest and penalties. Visit IRS.gov/payments for all payment options.

IRS YouTube Videos:

You can find this information on Tips for Taxpayers Who Owe Taxes on The IRS Website by clicking this link — #IRSTaxTip

Please feel free to contact Tax On Wheels, LLC if we can be of assistance to you.  We can be reached at 803 732-4288

IRS Offers New Cash Payment Option

April 17, 2016

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service announced a new payment option for individual taxpayers who need to pay their taxes with cash. In partnership with ACI Worldwide’s OfficialPayments.com and the PayNearMe Company, individuals can now make a payment without the need of a bank account or credit card at over 7,000 7-Eleven stores nationwide.

“We continue to look for new ways to provide services for our taxpayers. Taxpayers have many options to pay their tax bills by direct debit, a check or a credit card, but this provides a new way for people who can only pay their taxes in cash without having to travel to an IRS  Taxpayer Assistance Center,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.

Individuals wishing to take advantage of this payment option should visit the IRS.gov payments page, select the cash option in the other ways you can pay section and follow the instructions:

  • Taxpayers will receive an email from OfficialPayments.com confirming their information.
  • Once the IRS has verified the information, PayNearMe sends the taxpayer an email with a link to the payment code and instructions.
  • Individuals may print the payment code provided or send it to their smart phone, along with a list of the closest 7-Eleven stores.
  • The retail store provides a receipt after accepting the cash and the payment usually posts to the taxpayer’s account within two business days.
  • There is a $1,000 payment limit per day and a $3.99 fee per payment.

Because PayNearMe involves a three-step process, the IRS urges taxpayers choosing this option to start the process well ahead of the tax deadline to avoid interest and penalty charges.

The IRS has been partnering with Official Payments since 1999 for taxpayers wanting to use a credit card to pay taxes.

In this new option, PayNearMe is currently available at participating 7-Eleven stores in 34 states. Most stores are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week,. For details about PayNearMe, the IRS offers a list of frequently asked questions on IRS.gov.

The IRS reminds individuals without the need to pay in cash that IRS Direct Pay offers the fastest and easiest way to pay the taxes they owe. Available at IRS.gov/Payments/Direct-Pay, this free, secure online tool allows taxpayers to pay their income tax directly from a checking or savings account without any fees or pre-registration.

“Taxpayers should  look into the payment option that works best for them,” Koskinen said.

Check IRS.gov/payments for the most current information about making a tax payment.

The IRS continues to remind taxpayers to watch out for email schemes. Taxpayers will only receive an email from OfficialPayments.com or PayNearMe if they have initiated the payment process. The IRS reminds taxpayers who haven’t taken this step to be watchful of any emails they receive saying there are tax issues involving the IRS or from others in the tax industry.

Please contact Tax On Wheels, LLC at 803 732-4288 if you have questions or need assistance with any state or federal tax matters.

A Summer Adjustment Can Prevent a Tax-Time Surprise

When it comes to filing a federal tax return, many people discover that they either get a larger refund or owe more tax than they expected. But this type of tax surprise doesn’t have to happen to you. One way to prevent it is to change the amount of tax withheld from your wages. You can also change the amount of estimated tax you pay. Here are some tips to help you bring the amount of tax that you pay in during the year closer to what you’ll actually owe:

•    New Job.   When you start a new job, you must fill out a Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. Your employer will use the form to figure the amount of federal income tax to withhold from your pay. Use the IRS Withholding Calculator on IRS.gov to help you fill out the form. This tool is easy to use and it’s available 24/7.

•    Estimated Tax.  If you get income that’s not subject to withholding you may need to pay estimated tax. This may include income such as self-employment, interest, dividends or rent. If you expect to owe a thousand dollars or more in tax, and meet other conditions, you may need to pay this tax. You normally pay it four times a year. Use the worksheet in Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals, to figure the tax.

•    Life Events.  Make sure you change your Form W-4 or change the amount of estimated tax you pay when certain life events take place. A change in your marital status, the birth of a child or buying a new home can change the amount of taxes you owe. You can usually submit a new Form W–4 anytime.

•    Changes in Circumstances.  If you receive advance payment of the premium tax credit in 2014 it is important that you report changes in circumstances, such as changes in your income or family size, to your Health Insurance Marketplace. You should also notify the Marketplace when you move out of the area covered by your current Marketplace plan. Advance payments of the premium tax credit provide financial assistance to help you pay for the insurance you buy through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Reporting changes will help you get the proper type and amount of financial assistance so you can avoid getting too much or too little in advance.

For more see Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax. You can get it on IRS.gov, or call 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676) to get it by mail.

Additional IRS Resources:

  • Publication 5152: Report changes to the Marketplace as they happen  English | Spanish

IRS YouTube Videos:  

IRS Podcasts:

 

 

Use IRS Direct Pay to make free one time federal tax payments

The IRS recently announced that taxpayers could now make free one time federal tax payments using Direct Pay.  There are no fees and no complicated registration requirements to use this service.  It can be used for balances due or estimated tax payments.  This promises to be an excellent alternative to the time consuming and sometimes complicated registration process for making payments using EFTPS.

We typically recommend that clients allow Tax On Wheels, LLC to set up an automatic draft from your checking account when we transmit the return to the IRS.  But this is not always a viable option for taxpayers still trying to make arrangements for paying over the funds to the IRS.  Now you can pay when it is most convenient for you and your pocketbook.

This is a nice little tool.  Who says the IRS is not user friendly?

 

Tips for Taxpayers Who Can’t Pay Their Taxes on Time

If you find you owe tax after completing your federal tax return but can’t pay it all when you file, the IRS wants you to know your options.

Here are four tips that can help you lower the amount of interest and penalties when you don’t pay the full amount on time.

1. File on time and pay as much as you can. Filing on time ensures that you will avoid the late filing penalty. Paying as much as you can reduces the late payment penalty and interest charges. For electronic payment options, see IRS.gov. If you pay by check, make it payable to the United States Treasury and include it with your return.

2. Consider getting a loan or paying by credit card. The interest and fees charged by a bank or credit card company may be lower than IRS interest and penalties. For credit card options, see IRS.gov.

3. Request a payment agreement.  You do not need to wait for IRS to send you a bill before requesting a payment plan. You can:

    • Use the Online Payment Agreement tool at IRS.gov, or
    • Complete and submit Form 9465, Installment Agreement

Request, with your tax return. Find out about payment agreement user fees at IRS.gov or on Form 9465.

4. Don’t ignore a tax bill.  If you get a bill from the IRS, contact them right away to talk about payment options. The IRS may take collection action if you ignore the bill, which will only make things worse.

In short, it is always best to file on time, pay as much as you can by the tax deadline and pay the balance as soon as you can. For more information on the IRS collection process contact Tax On Wheels, LLC at 803 732-4288.